Latest Data Reveals Record Number of Drug Overdose Deaths in US

The data is in, and it’s not good. A record number of drug overdose deaths have been reported in the United States over the past year, with an alarming increase in opioid-related deaths. In this blog post, we take a closer look at the latest data to understand why this is happening and what can be done to prevent further tragedy.

Drug Overdose Deaths Reach Record High in US

Drug Overdose Deaths Reach Record High in US. Provisional counts from the National Vital Statistics System indicate that drug overdose deaths across the US have reached a record high of 93,331 in 2020. This is a 16.1% increase from 2019 and 34.4% increase in drug overdose deaths helped drive this record high. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 107,735 overdose deaths in the US in the 12-month period ending in September 2020, with prescription opioid rising from 3,442 to 17,029. Opioid were the main driver of the 2020 record high, with fentanyl reaching unprecedented levels. These figures demonstrate the urgent need for action to address this public crisis.

CDC Reports 107,735 Overdose Deaths in US

CDC Reports 107,735 Overdose Deaths in US – according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provisional counts for drug overdose deaths in the 12-month period ending in April 2021, rose to a record high of 107,735. This is an increase of 34.4% over the previous year and over 633 deaths were incorrectly identified on death certificates. Opioids were the leading cause of these overdose deaths, with an estimated 75,673 fatalities; this is a rise from 3,442 to 17,029 fatalities due to prescription opioids. These figures underscore the impact of the nation’s opioid crisis and highlight the need for greater prevention efforts.

Highest Number of Overdose Deaths in 12-Month Period

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that the highest number of drug overdose deaths ever recorded occurred during the 12-month period ending in March 2022, with provisional data estimating there were 109,000 fatalities. This marks a 34.4% increase since 2019 and brings the total number of preventable deaths in the United States to an all-time high. The CDC also reported that prescription opioid overdoses rose from 3,442 in 1999 to 17,029 in 2017, accounting for much of the increase in drug overdose deaths over the past two decades.

Prescription Opioid Overdoses Rose from 3,442 to 17,029

The latest data reveals a record number of drug overdose deaths in the United States. According to the CDC, 107,735 people died from drug overdoses in the US in 2020, with prescription opioid overdoses rising from 3,442 in 1999 to 17,029 in 2017. This marks a 34.4% increase in drug overdose deaths from the previous 12-month period, and 633 deaths that were not correctly identified on death certificates. The highest number of overdose deaths were seen in 10 counties with rates higher than the statewide average. It is clear that preventable deaths have reached an all-time high and urgent action is needed to address this growing problem.

Opioid Overdoses Drive 2020 Record High

Opioid Overdoses Drive 2020 Record High; according to the latest data from the CDC, drug overdose deaths in the US reached an all-time high in 2020 with 107,735 fatalities. Synthetic opioids including fentanyl were responsible for a large number of these deaths, with 56,516 reported in 2020 alone – a 41% increase from 2019. Prescription opioid overdoses also rose from 3,442 to 17,029 in the same period. Furthermore, 633 deaths were not correctly identified on death certificates and drug overdose deaths were higher than the statewide average in 10 counties. It is clear that more needs to be done to address this public crisis and reduce preventable deaths.

Over 633 Deaths Not Correctly Identified on Death Certificates

At least 633 deaths occurring in hospitals that met the criteria of opioid overdose were not correctly identified on death records, according to a recent study. This alarming data reveals a 34.4% increase in drug overdose deaths from 2017 to 2019, and is the highest number of preventable deaths in 12-month period. Further, prescription opioid overdoses rose from 3,442 in 1999 to 17,029 in 2017. This data serves as a reminder of the urgent need to address the opioid crisis in the United States, which is impacting thousands of lives.

Breaking Down Data by Race/Ethnicity

Breaking Down Data by Race/Ethnicity reveals disparities in the number of drug overdose deaths across the United States. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, White people had the highest rate of overdose deaths in 2018 among people aged 15 to 34. However, between 2018 and 2021, rates increased faster among Black New Yorkers, with a total rate of 38.2 per 100,000 residents and the largest absolute increase in drug overdoses. The CDC data also shows that American Indian/Alaskan Natives had the highest rate of overdose deaths in 2020 at 61.3 per 100,000 population. In addition, data from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) indicates that young adults 18 to 25 years of age report the highest rates of lifetime drug use. This data highlights the importance of understanding and addressing disparities when it comes to drug overdose prevention and treatment efforts.

Drug Overdose Deaths Higher Than Statewide Average in 10 Counties

In 10 counties, the number of drug overdose deaths was higher than the statewide average. The National Center for Health Statistics reported that in 2020, US drug overdose deaths totaled 83558, a 34.4% increase from 2019 and an all-time high. Additionally, the CDC reported 107,735 overdose deaths in the US in 2020, which is the highest number in any 12-month period. Furthermore, prescription opioid overdoses rose from 3,442 to 17,029 between 1999 and 2017. It is evident that opioid overdoses are driving the 2020 record high in drug overdose deaths. Moreover, a study showed that 633 deaths were not correctly identified on death certificates. Breaking down data by race/ethnicity further reveals that males had a greater proportion of ED visits for opioid-involved overdoses among Minnesota residents in 2021.

Number of Preventable Deaths Reach All-Time High

The number of preventable deaths due to drug overdose has reached an all-time high in 2021. According to the latest data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 107,735 people died of a drug overdose in the 12-month period ending in April 2021, the highest number ever recorded. This marks a 34.4% increase from 2020, when 93,331 people died of a drug overdose. The opioid epidemic continues to be the major driver of this crisis, with prescription opioid overdoses rising from 3,442 in 1999 to 17,029 in 2017. Additionally, the number of overdose deaths involving synthetic drugs has also increased significantly. Unfortunately, more than 633 deaths were not correctly identified on death certificates as being due to drug overdose. In 2020, drug overdose death rates were higher than the statewide average in 10 of 15 counties for which there are data. These figures reveal just how serious this epidemic is and emphasize the urgent need for action to address this devastating issue.

34.4% Increase in Drug Overdose Deaths

The latest data reveals a record number of drug overdose deaths in the US, with 107,735 reported in 2020. This is the highest number of overdose deaths reported in a 12-month period. Prescription opioid overdoses rose from 3,442 to 17,029 during this period, driving the 2020 record high. Additionally, researchers found that at least 633 deaths occurring in hospitals that met the criteria of opioid overdose were not correctly identified on death certificates. Breaking down data by race/ethnicity reveals that drug overdose deaths are higher than the statewide average in 10 counties. This is indicative of a 34.4% increase in drug overdose deaths from 2020 to 2021, making it clear that the number of preventable deaths has reached an all-time high.